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are the big challenges year, what are the things different now? from a technology perspective, this is pretty easy. i can tell you that if we were to do this today, you would say, i cannot believe you were using lte phones and 4g, as i am using 6g. joining us is a director for cisco systems business solution group, which is a global strategy and consulting arm. prior to that, he was president and ceo of government's strategy is of a leading market research firm from 2001 to 2003 heading the industry advisory council, a founding member of a council, and he spent 28 years in the federal government, including being the first cio at the department of commerce, and he is also a winner. doug bourgeois is the chief for vmware. prior to that, he was the director of national business center at interior, where he provided business management services government wide like the ones we talked about he had several roles at fedex. he has also hosted the vmware's i.t. challenge. it airs in the washington, d.c., market. mark forman is the first official c.i.o., president and co-founder of government transacti
to do. >> how reliable is the internet on satellite these days? >> minimally. it is a technology that is the last resort for the internet. if there is no possibility of a physical connection -- there are fewer places in the world who do not have redundant physical connections. most remarkably, that is africa. they have seen six new cables down the coast where previously there was only one cable down the west coast. as much as possible, people are fromer to move away satellite because of the high costs and because what is known as latency, the time delay in making that trip. >> these centers in hudson, l ondon, ashford, when it comes to cybersecurity, would these be prime targets? >> no, i do not think they would be. i take cybersecurity very seriously, but i think the far greater concern is a threat through the network and not the physical threat of infrastructure itself. these buildings are well secured. these buildings operate redundantly with each other. say google and comcast having interconnecting networks. unit set up in los angeles and los angeles -- you would set up in lo
for the suggestion. we have about 25 minutes left. we'll come back and talk with jason pontin of the "mit technology review." the subject is about solving big problems in america. we'll take your calls in a moment. [video clip] >> the british admirals and generals were reporting to the crown that the colonists were sending ships everywhere to try to get ammunition and muskets and cannons. this was after the british had sent more troops to boston after the boston tea party and it's clear the colonists were pulling together the ammunition and cannons. the king basically prohibited british ships from taking ammunition and everything to the colonies unless it was officially sanctioned. they were very alert to this. as soon as the collins found out about the order in new hampshire and rhode island, they took the ammunition so everybody knew it was coming in the winter of 77 for-1775 -- in the winter of 1774-1775. >> "washington journal" continues. host: we are focusing on the "mit technology review." we are talking about big problems in the world. we will get to this coverage in just a second. this is ja
. this committee could give us a sense of direction. you have to commit yourself to high-risk technology. you reduce the time it takes to go to mars. you do it. we can develop technologies along those lines. it will take the committee's decision to give nascent those kinds of instructions to move it forward. there are ways to reach out for some of the other things we are doing. since i left congress i've been involved with the ffrdc. they recommend that at least some of the nasa centers near to that kind of model. you can have both a government funding stream going into the operation as well as outside money coming in to do other things. that allows you to have some other streams of money that is not depend on the appropriations process. seems to me this committee could come up was someone along those lines. that allows you to look forward as well as find the resources necessary. that is what i'm trying to suggest. think that is possible. i've worked with these companies looking to do exciting things. they would love to have nasa as a partner. you have to find out a way to find the ways for n
that companies that try to be innovative are not innovative. well, our technology leaders, the people who really inspired me, they were inspired by these wonderful things happening. i'm going to focus on a little period of time. as short as four years, maybe six or seven. it is that time that orville wright and his brother took off. the world realized -- they did not do that with photoshop. since that first flight, the people who had taken a flight could sit in that first wrote and only three of you would have taken a turn. we did not even have the internet. can you imagine? going from that -- they were building 500 airplanes a year in france by then. in four years. and of course, the airplane was invented by natural selection. we did not help -- we did not know how to do with. the ones that did not tell the pilot, they are today's airplane. [laughter] i believe that kids were inspired by this wonderful short period of time. on the 100th anniversary of the wright brothers applied, at aviation week asked me and others to say what i thought about the first 100 years of aerospace. who were the move
all aspects of technology that will have tremendous impact. even though they examples you mention are compelling, there are many aspects that come from a human side of nasa as well. i would not subscribe to that kind of recommendation. >> lower the emphasis a bit. >> making a distinction between science and exploration, nasa is more than just a science agency, it is an exploration agency, a tool of u.s. farm policy. just looking at sites as defined in the service, it is realistic for. the reason why you do human in part is for exploring the unknown, but putting people in an unusual or alien situation. you learn things you would not learn if he stayed at home. there is a wonderful example looking at someone -- and viruses and how they become changed in space. this means there is a gene sequencing issue. if we can figure out how to control but, we could have a potential vaccine for salmonella. that is not the thing that would emerge into a ground based laboratory. it emerges might put people in a very different environment to go into the unknown. human space flight is probably the m
. at the same time, the nature of military conflict is changing. because of the new technologies like cyber and proliferation of missiles, we are seeing potential adversaries, state and non state actors alike acquire more advanced, hybrid and high- end capabilities designed to frustrate the conventional advantages of our armed forces. this means the military services must remain vigilant and strong and appeared to . to operate in a way that differs significantly from the past. we will continue to face terrorism and deadly attacks by ied's, but we must also be ready for more capable adversaries to attack our forces and homeland in cyberspace. to attack and launch precision strikes against forward bases, to attempt to cripple our power grid, our financial systems, our government systems. to attempt to deny us freedom of action isometric attacks. as i said, the goals of our new defense strategy is to help shape the force of the 21st century. try to adapt our forces and operating concept said that we are better prepared for an unpredictable and dangerous future. we have been determined to avoid
with the great improvements in technology that unleashed the powers of capitalism, and capitalism manage to produce immense wealth. something unpleasant but -- and at the same time produce poverty that had never been known before. the debt is to capitalism what hell is to christianity. unpleasant, but absolutely necessary. in a sense, capitalism is about ecological economics, even though capitalists don't want to hear this. it is about recycling. we had heard of the term by the 1970's, especially about the green movement in europe. capitalism has always been recycling. the process of described is a process whereby the entrepreneur is now forced to be an entrepreneur. the ex-peasants, they did not choose to be entrepreneurs. they had to be. they used debt. bringing it to the present, energizing the production process, producing the wealth from which he hopes that he will be able to repay the debt. the moneylenders, later the bankers. cover for the fact that he had paid wages for capital goods. hoping there is something left for him, for profit. debt is all about intertemporal recycling. b
voters online this campaign than we registered altogether in the last campaign. so the technology has made it easier to organize. in a weird way, the technology has made it easier to individualize hour appeal to voters and the dialogue with voters. i think what was done with this campaign was light years ahead of what we did in the last campaign. whoever is in 2016 will have to reinvent it again because the technology changes so rapidly. twitter was nothing four years ago, and look how important it was in this campaign. one other surprise -- i was surprised at how little the republicans invested in the field in their primary campaign. one thing that really benefited us in 2008 was we had a 50- state primary campaign. from the beginning, we were determined to run a very aggressive and field campaign. we set up operations and all the states -- in all the states. in the battleground states, those organizations sustain themselves. in iowa, that was very important. so i would not, given the nature of the process, at least in those early states, if i were running in 2016 i would not do what
, they are rooted in scientific discovery and technological innovation. there has to be a greater appreciation for the role of science and technology in society. we have to get young women engaged early. we found that if young women are engaged in experiments to work, if they are part of the team, it makes a big difference. we try to create an intergene rational mentoring system. when young women come through the ranks through the promotion and tenure process, we have to ensure fairness of the system. it is a complex problem. that is why it is hard for people to talk about it. >> why is it important that there are more women? >> it is important that there be more science. we are about to face what i call the quiet crisis. you have a number of scientists in this country who came of age when i did. they are beginning to retire. those retirements are going to accelerate over the next few years. the second hidden variable is that we depend strongly on immigrants. we have always been a nation of immigrants. i do not think people appreciate how much of our science and engineering work force is made
, then distribution, then production. in conjunction with the great improvements in technology that unleashed the powers of capitalism, and capitalism manage to produce immense wealth, and at the same time produce poverty that had never been known before. the debt is to capitalism what hell is to christianity. unpleasant, but absolutely necessary for it to work. in a sense, capitalism is about ecological economics, even though capitalists don't want to hear this. it is about recycling. we had heard of the term by the 1970's, especially about the green movement in europe. capitalism has always been recycling. the process of described is a process whereby the entrepreneur is now forced to be an entrepreneur. the ex-peasants, they did not choose to be entrepreneurs. they had to be. they used debt. bringing it to the present, energizing the production process, producing the wealth from which he hopes that he will be able to repay the debt. the moneylenders, later the bankers. cover for the fact that he had paid wages for capital goods. hoping there is something left for him, for profit. debt is a
we steady besides voting and what voters decided. we study technology and how it is changing the way people engaged with campaigns. we study a lot about survey research as a practice going on. i am open to talking about those as well. >> thank you. [applause] >> let me start with a question, michael. you mentioned earlier about the composition of the electorate and what that meant. you made the comment about a new way of thinking. people are now talking about the dwindling white portion of the electorate. i am wondering for what that means in shifts in public opinion on various matters. the fact that we actually have a shrinking white electorate so that minority groups, latinos, and african-americans are playing a larger proportion of the electorate. what does that mean and thinking about public opinion? >> i think it is critical. clearly one of the biggest changes in the overlap of the generational changes. 18-29-year old voters, 42 percent for nine why -- for non- white. this is a generational wave coming in. the way behind it, the folks 0- 18 right now are even more in that direct
been built in, rather than using some other technology that is newer, available -- it might be scary if your the person whose job is going to be lost when the data center goes down. >> at the heart of every internet enterprise our data centers, which are becoming more sprawling and ubiquitous as the amount of stored information explodes, starting in community after community. but the microsoft experience in quincy, washington shows that when these internet factories come to town, they can feel a bit more like old-time manufacturing than modern magic. what is the quincy, washington story? >> the story we set out to tell there was just sort of microsoft comes to town. it is a small town, around 7000 people. it has one quality that sets it apart from a lot of other small towns. it sits near the columbia river and a couple of hydroelectric dams that produce very cheap and continuous power. microsoft came to town in 2005 or so, 2006. what the story shows is that while you have this up-to-the- minute corporate image of what a digital company like microsoft is, it is a lot more like a tradi
? >> if you look at technology, there is some technology we could look at and we are always in this dialogue -- is there some new mechanism we could put forward. one of the challenges is consumers will often talk about two or three different accounts on the front page of the letter. we cannot send bank of america information about citigroup or another lender. we need to parse before the letter. one of the legal issues we have, as a matter of law, is how to unpacked important communications sowed data can be sent from one party to another if it will advance the ball beyond the coating systems we have today. we think we are getting it right. most of the letters come in and they said that is not my account or they say i net -- i never missed a 30-day payment. more consumers are choosing to dispute directly with their lender. >> even if the lender is not the furniture? >> lender would be the furniture. through the fact act, a push for the idea that i should have this right under law. we see more consumers with complicated issues going to the lender to resolve the issue and that's why you will co
of years as opposed to decades or centuries, because that's what the capitalists and did through technology and innovation, the moment you start doing that, like having a machine that prints money, so you want to use more faster and more intensely, producing more money. if you overreach and take too much value from the future to bring it into the present, you too. the sectors in which this dynamic annapolis process is manchin to push the boundaries of technology and create wealth -- in amsterdam and holland the with-it is always local lines. there will always be surplus riches. regis and surplus regions. southern england was in debt. now is the obvious. similarly, you have new york state in surplus, washington state inertification plus. it started in manchester, in amsterdam. it is always localized. there will always be defecit regions and surplus regions. so, manchester northern england was in surplus back then. southern england was in debt. now it is the opposite. similarly, you have new york state in surplus, washington state in surplus. illinois, the dakotas in debt. missouri is your eq
. [applause] how would i advise a president who is not interested in nasa doing better technologies and doing exploration like it did in the 1960's? is that a better question? i was telling him that the public's has an expectation for this $18 billion, that you spend a large percentage of it, maybe even a large majority of it, on pure research. in other words, i want you to take my tax payer money and go out and try to do something that you may not be able to do. in fact, i call it research only if half the people think is impossible. if most of the people think it is possible, then you are doing development. you are not a research organization. if you took anybody out of nasa, out of engineering, i don't care if they were head of nasa or a secretary or a shop guy, when jfk got up and said 21 days after alan shepard made this little flight, that we are going to go to the moon before 1970, everybody jumped up and down. you know why? multi-year funding. wow, we are going to have jobs for nine years. yes, we can do it. this is cool. we will beat the russians. everybody was real excited. grab any
and technologically advanced these weapons are. all stemming from military weapons. there are even devices that can be put in legally that make them fully automatic. as he read the literature, you see the enormous killing power that is up there on the streets for virtually anybody to buy or obtained. >> you mentioned you have been meeting people and hearing from them. i was curious whether you thought the and are a struck an appropriate tone today. -- the and are a struck an appropriate time today. >> i think there bothas and mine may have been with the people of newtown but it was not evident in the proposals made today. i do not want to comment on the memories and the morning of people, which i am very respectful of the. i think today is one of sadness for me. i hope to honor the memory of those victims by what we do a denture the congress. they as much as anybody in the whole country, their families loved ones and friends are calling for action. >> can you name any new gop members who have come forward to support any kind of gun control? >> not at this time, but i have not had the opportunity to
education and research and development, investing in clean energy and technology, investing in infrastructure and dealing with the deficits were more -- in a more balanced way. it was about what our obligations are to each other. it was about big things. those are very, very big things. i will say that, for all of the critique about whether our campaign was about big things or not, the preoccupations of people who write about that -- and i used to do that for a living -- i don't try to separate myself -- many of them are my best friends -- there is an awful lot of horse race coverage of this presidential race. there is such a preoccupation with who will win and who will lose and so little real interest in what the implications are. >> we were talking about pulling. >> public polling is so voluminous now. any to kids with an abacus can do a poll of the corner grocery store and some national news are in position will cover it as if it is news. and maybe the billion tommy pulled him out today. -- the billy and tommy poll came out today. it can be done sound yet they produce res
to support a growing population. we have not develop the technologies to solve those problems. here at home we have a very high unemployment rate. and of course, we have a generation of aging baby boomers, like myself, who are wondering how we are going to support ourselves and our retirement. these are all big problems. my thesis is that we will get much further toward solving them if we can engage the power of the private sector to contribute to peace and prosperity. i tell people, i love corporations. i study them the way jane goodall studies chimpanzees. and i appreciate their potential to help solve their as problems -- to help solve those problems, to provide jobs to people who need to make a living, and provide decent investment returns. to come up with the technologies that can help us have a more sustainable future where we are in harmony with the environment and the planet. a lot of corporations are doing those things, but not as well as corporations could. corporations could contribute still more toward human welfare and avoid doing damage in some areas where they do, if only we
. from armed security to building design and access control, the information technology, student and teacher training, this multifaceted program will be developed by the very best experts in the field. former congressman asa hutchinson will lead the effort as national director of the national model school shield program with a budget provided by the nra of what ever scope the task requires. his experience as a united states attorney, director of the drug enforcement agency, and undersecretary of the department of homeland security will given the knowledge and expertise to hire the most knowledgeable and credentialed experts available in the united states of america to get this program up and running from the first day forward. if we truly cherish our kids more than our money, more than our celebrities, more than our sports stadiums, we must give them the greatest level of protection possible and that security is only available with properly trained armed good guys. under asa's leadership our experts were make this program available to the world to protect their children at school
the information. is that a violation of a lot of the have not provided -- it is a technology issue that i think to be fixed easily enough? second, it is just an issue they make a determination. is that a violation of fcra or a violation of the law? >> our purpose of putting together this paper that is characteristic of the work of all of our market teams is supposed to be prescriptive instead of descriptive. what we are describing is what we have heard. we have many tools and which we could make determinations about whether the law is being violated or not. in this is, that is what is going to happen. we have found this information is not being forwarded. >> is it a fair statement to say that consumers must provide evidence when they challenge a credit score, but the creditors are taken at their word? >> to describe the system that way i think would be accurate. you are saying the consumer can provide information. it will not get to the furniture necessarily in the way they provided it. does it provided into codes. it can be put into the limited text field. it can get to the furnisher. >> or ma
amount of social interaction, which is lacking now as we know. one is the technology and the other is the demand and fundraising. they spend so much time raising money and the do not have time to spend together. everything is different. nothing about the sun is better other than the influx -- nothing about the senate is better other than the influx of women. the fact that we have 20 now, which is a record, that makes a big difference. on the other hand, the hyper partisan senate is interesting. i number of people have said over time, boy, the senators must not like your book. they're fine with the book. they do not think much of the senate. [laughter] my sympathy extends to a certain point. have the power to change it. it does not have to be the way that it is. >> i want to go back to edit point -- to a point that he made. it was a laid oeave out, tough race. they gave the vote count and everything else. kennedy started working for five years to make sure byrd never becomes majority leader. he interviews a number of people. he does not want to take byrd onto himself. he is looking
, technology and higher education, encouraging more young people to study science, technology, engineering and math, known as stem, to make sure that we are bringing thoseoung minds with the creativity and t engineering background to create the economies for the future is so important. that has been the lifeblood of our economy, and it must continue. saving the manned space exploration program and ensuring the long-term future of nasa, an essential generator for our economy. ensuring that stay-at-home moms and dads who work so hard raising childre and contributing to the community have spousal ira's to save for retirement. and easing the marriage tax penalty by doubling the standard deduction are just a few of the things that i hope will continue to be championed as i leave. it has been such an honor to serve in the united states senate, and i leave with the hope that the values that built america into the greatest nation on earth will be protected so that future generations will have the same opportunities that we have had in this great country and that our forebearers sacrificed so much
to cooperate with china on many other fronts. we have many other engagements in terms of science and technology, clean energy, collaboration's by our center for disease control, trying to look at the various world health problems, the solutions to which benefit united states as well. we will always have disagreements. we have disagreements with canada on trade issues. we have disagreements with france and mexico and many other countries. there is a mechanism by which we can all go to neutral refereeing of those issues. the wto is one way that we can do that. [inaudible] >> i did not have a chance to read that article. am not familiar with everything that was mentioned in that article. two months before the election, there was this big tough-on- china -- >> the pivot was announced almost a year before that. what set of the discussion of the exhibit was the announcement -- pivot was the announcement of rotating 2000 marines throughout australia. i do not think china should be fearful of 2000 marines hit in australia. -- in australia. our engagement with other countries throughout the asia- pacifi
, to information, technology to student and teacher training. this multi-faceted program will be developed by the very best spirits in the field. -- experts in the field. former congressman hutchison will lead this program. with a budget provided by the n.r.a. on whatever scope the task requires. host: that was wayne lapierre, n.r.a. executive vice president in a news conference here in washington yesterday. more on the discussion and response by the n.r.a. this is steve from covington, georgia on our line for independents. steve, you're on the "washington journal." caller: good morning. i'd like to say to your last caller. i've got two little girls. they are twins, 7 years old. they came running in here crying and i got up to see what they were watching, and they were calling for blood in the streets. the union was calling for blood in the streets up there, and it scared them to death. they said daddy, are they going to kill us? i said, no, i don't think. so if we're going to have to limit our clitches to 10 bullets, the union is going to have to limit their members to 10 people, because
of technological innovation. usd not want to see a lose that again. -- i do not want to see us lose that again. host: 1 more tweet, once capital gains are taxed at the same rate as income, investors will still invest -- will not change a thing. guest: that depends what the rates are. history shows that to be true time and time again. whether the democrats institute the cuts, or whether the republicans do it, you can see the results. some countries around the world that have left of center governments have massively simplify their tax code, put in flat tax rates. revenues have mushroomed. host: the next call comes from santa elena, texas. caller: can somehow every state verify the people from health care, medicare, medicaid to be sure the people qualify? i did not know if i am right or wrong -- if we give medicare and medicaid to people who just come from other nations, no matter where, and they qualify -- we have a problem with medicaid and medicare. can we do some the about it? -- something about it? we have a lot of intelligent people. with everybody working together, we can do something. ho
the technologies to solve those problems. here at home we have a very high unemployment rate. and of course, we have a generation of aging baby boomers, like myself, who are wondering how we are going to support ourselves and our retirement. these are all big problems. my thesis is that we will get much further toward solving them if we can engage the power of the private sector to contribute to peace and prosperity. i tell people, i love corporations. i study them the way jane goodall studies chimpanzees. and i appreciate their potential to help solve those problems, to provide jobs to people who need to make a living, and provide decent investment returns. to come up with the technologies that can help us have a more sustainable future where we are in harmony with the environment and the planet. a lot of corporations are doing those things, but not as well as corporations could. corporations could contribute still more toward human welfare and avoid doing damage in some areas where they do, if only we can correct what i have come to view as a very mistaken and ultimately counterproductive ide
of changing -- changing technology. but let me make two more points about young people. let me tell you two stories about poland. we were in poland i think eight years ago in september i was going to visit the supreme courts in poland. and when you go to european countries you have to go to three supreme courts often, the constitution court, the administrative court, and a court of general jurisdiction. you go to three dinners and bring three gifts. [laughter] >> but there are fine judges and fine courts. at first i was teaching in krakow for a few days and then went to warsaw and i ranged to meet with the faculty at the university of warsaw and they explained the students wouldn't be there. it's the third week in september. i don't think they were coming until the first week in october. but the fact we were going to be there, arranged for me to meet with the faculty, and we did. midway through the meeting, though, there are some notes being passed and they said oh, justice kennedy, we didn't realize our answering law students are here for an orientation day and would like you to talk with
of some of the work that i did, information technology, hardware. whatever it takes, we of the to dedicate resources. you cannot get the results you want just by yelling and screaming. you have got to have investment and resources. the third point i want to make, your credibility as the department would be greatly enhanced by the pace of implementation, but it demonstrable success you have. taxpayers can see the you have made those changes. and by the steps your taking now and in the next couple of days and weeks. that is most important for the greater concerns we have, but especially important when you come back here and ask for dollars. i will stand with anyone to say that resources matter. i know that from personal experience. but your credibility would be enhanced when you ask for those resources if you can specifically focus on what those resources will go for and how you're going to be able to change the dynamic. i do not have much time. let me ask a question that i am not sure it has been raised yet. number one, host country cooperation. another is great variance. there is great var
these -- and some of the priorities will continue. encouraging more young people to study technology, engineering, and math. make sure that we are bringing those young minds with the creativity and engineering backgrounds to create the economies for the future is so important. that has been the lifeblood of our economy. saving the man for space exploration program and ensuring the long-term future of nasa is essential for our economy. ensuring that stay-at-home moms and dads who work hard and raising children children and contributing to the communities have spousal ira's for retirement. those are just a few of the things that i hope will intended to be championed as i leave. it has been an honor to serve in the u.s. senate. i leave with the hope that the values that built america into the and greatest nation on earth will be protected so that future generations will have the same art or two navies that we have had -- will have the same opportunities that we have had. we have sacrificed so much to ensure that we do. thank you, madam president. >> senator elect ted cuz will be replacing senator hu
to building design and access control, to information technology, to student and teacher training, this multifaceted program will be developed by the very best experts in the field. a former congressman will lead the effort. with a budget provided by the nra, of whatever scope the task requires -- >> that is from the ceo of the nra. the front-page headline -- philadelphia inquirer" -- back to your calls and comments on the issue of gun control. what is ahead? kathleen from chicago. caller: good morning. okay, give me a couple of seconds. first of all, i hear everybody calling in, talking about mental illness. how do you define mental illness? i cannot say this guy's name that did all of this killing last friday. i do not even want to say his name. killing all these innocent babies. who was mentally ill? him, doing this killing, or his mother who knew that she had a mentally ill child and purchased all these weapons, brought them back into the house around him, took him to the firing range, taught him how to shoot these guns -- one was mentally ill? this other guy, the nra -- when
. resources matter. whether its personnel or, in the case of some of the work i did, information technology, hardware, whatever it takes we got to dedicate the resources. we cannot get the results you want just by yelling and screaming. you've got to have investment and resources. third point i would make is that your credibility at the department will be greatly enhanced by the pace of implementation, by the demonstrable success you have. in other words, that taxpayers can see that you have made those changes, and by the steps you are taking now in the next couple of days and weeks. that's mostly important for the broader concerns that we have, but it's especially important when you come back here and ask for dollars. i will stand with anyone to say that resources matter. i know that from personal experience, but your credibility would be enhanced when you ask for those resources, when you can specifically focus on what those resources will go for, and how you're going to be able to change the dynamics. so let me, i know i don't have much time, but with a predicate company asked a question
equipment for a new forced to act as a strike force against the armed groups. they can use technology to the knowledge the number of peacekeeping needed by offering contract advisers to monitor the border areas. finally, there needs to be consideration of the poor record of civilians. some are considering it an option to bring the neutral international force under troop levels. this is a model that could be replicated. pakistani forces joined the peacekeeping operations under a un mandate with a distinct mission to move this off the .ines the international portion is not a peacekeeping mission. these are interpreted by a un headquarters. in conclusion, the u.s. government must act with humility knowing that people of the region are ultimately responsible. we can only assist them to establish the robust regional security mechanisms that are the foundations for eliminating all armed forces. thank you very much. >> thank you. i want to start by saying i believe the united states does have an interest in promoting peace and prosperity. i believe it can play a constructive role. from a sec
, they have this biometric technology, where they think print individuals -- fingerprint individuals to make sure they're not committing fraud. that is been controversial. host: alisha coleman-jensen -- food insecurity by poverty status, 2011 figures. guest: food insecurity and is often related to a lack of economic resources, and we find the prevalence is quite high with household incomes before the below the federal poverty level -- below the federal poverty level. host: another tweet -- , corn is wasted on making fuel while people are going hungry. is that part of the problem? guest: i think it is more of an economic issue than a supply issue. we're looking at low income families and resources to purchase the food. host: spat and island, extension -- step and island, new york. caller: i want to not focus on the specifics. i would label many dinos and r hinos as cinos, holding to their corporate funders more than people in the state. guest: i am one point to make their. the food stamp program was in the news during the presidential campaign. there was a lot talk about caseloads going up, i
this biometric technology, where they think print individuals -- fingerprint individuals to make sure they're not committing fraud. that is been controversial. host: alisha coleman-jensen -- food insecurity by poverty status, 2011 figures. guest: food insecurity is often related to a lack of economic resources, and we find the prevalence is quite high with household incomes below the federal poverty level. host: another tweet -- corn is wasted on making fuel while people are going hungry. is that part of the problem? guest: i think it is more of an economic issue than a supply issue. we're looking at low income families and resources to purchase the food. host: staten island, new york. caller: i want to not focus on the specifics. i would label many dinos and rinos as cinos, holding to their corporate funders more than people in the state. guest: i have one point to make there. the food stamp program was in the news during the presidential campaign. there was a lot talk about caseloads going up, and the implication was that these caseloads should be cut and that is a bad thing. what we lea
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